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Posts tagged ‘Dr Lee Outlaw’

I am an Epileptic

 

Having been one all my life, it is sometimes easy to overlook the fact that I am indeed an epileptic.

I am on medication and live a fairly normal life. I do most everything that non-epileptic people do; in fact after eleven years and seven attorneys attempting to get this “Grand General Epileptic” disability, the state and federal governments denied such because they declared that I was a “functional epileptic”.

“Functional epileptic”, is there really such a thing? That’s a topic for another discussion.

None the less, most epileptics will tell you it’s not necessarily the seizure that’s the great concern but everything leading up to and afterwards such as pre and post seizure auras that are truly debilitating and hinder the ability to “be normal”.  

For the non-epileptic, it’s important to note that epileptic auras are for most, more dreaded than the seizure itself and like a seizure they can occur unexpectedly at any time with or without medication with no reason as to the cause.  

One thing for certain is that there is nothing fun about an aura. They can last from a few minutes to hours or even days. The average aura time for most epileptics I know is about 15 minutes. My average aura last 24 hours but I have experienced a pre-seizure aura which lasted 2 days and a post-seizure aura which lasted almost a week.

Auras are terrible. They can be mild to migraine headaches, the proverbial “seeing stars”, visualizing “saintly” like glows or halos around people, visualization can take on a yellowish hue as well as experiencing  strange sounds and odors.

But the worst aura experience of all for most epileptics is dissociation; the feeling of uncertainty of where you are or what many epileptics describe as a sensation of being in multiple places at the same time. Some have suggested it is like you’re here but also somewhere else. The bottom line is if you haven’t experienced it, you simply can’t understand.

The aura often causes an epileptic to lose momentary thought, focus and concentration.

Some research now suggests that due to their debilitating effect on the epileptic, these auras are actually partial seizures. Regardless of what these auras are, they can certainly slow a person down, delay or even force a change or cancellation to plans.

It is important to note here that some epileptics never experience an aura.

In addition to the auras and seizures, there is also the emotional trauma sitting in the epileptics unconscious mind constantly asking the question, “Will I have a seizure today”? And “If I have a seizure today, what kind will it be”?  

Those questions usually give rise to more questions which give rise to more questions such as, “Since I feel kind of strange today, should I go out in public and chance having a seizure away from home”? If you drive, “Should I try to drive today and possibly have an accident or even hurt or kill someone”?

“I’m feeling constantly sleepy, do I need sleep or am I trying to pass out and seize” and “if I take a little nap, will I have a sleep or wakeup seizure”? “Should I go to the ER or should I call my neurologist or am I just being silly and paranoid”?

Although life for everyone is filled with uncertainties, for the epileptic these uncertainties become magnified.

For this epileptic, the past month had gone very well; between my medications of Depakote and CBD oil I was stable and feeling great. I had gone to church, out to eat, a birthday party or two and even driving during day light hours. Being an epileptic simply wasn’t on my radar and didn’t seem to matter.

Then suddenly out of nowhere last Saturday, I experienced the worst aura since 2008. My hands and arms shaking, visualization suddenly yellowed, found myself staring for long moments into space, then the dreaded feeling of disassociation; the feeling of being in two separate places at once.

The feeling was horrible and quite frightening. The last time I had an aura that intense was prior to a “Grand Mal” seizure while driving in 2008. There was nobody hurt and no damage except to my van which was totaled. Thank God a police officer witnessed the entire thing and called the paramedics who took me to the ER immediately.

That recent Saturday aura suddenly brought me back to reality reminding me that I am an epileptic.

Then this very morning, with plans in process, my day is interrupted by having a moderate morning wakeup seizure with a traumatic follow up post-seizure aura destroying both my plans for the day and possibly my future.

It is totally debilitating, destructive and often humiliating (as it was for me today), this thing we call epilepsy.

But once again, I am an epileptic and as most neurologists tell us, we can have a seizure at any moment of any day; unfortunately for some repeatedly throughout the day.

Cancelled plans and appointments, inability to keep commitments, feelings of inadequacies and indecisiveness, frustration and associated depression; all associated with epilepsy.

Take the meds as prescribed, get eight hours sleep, try and avoid naps and seizure causing meds and still a seizure and/or an aura is possible.

I can never forget I am an epileptic.

© 2017 Lee W. Outlaw III, PhD

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The Suspicious Mind Pt. III, The Doubt & Secrecy Determiner

The Suspicious Mind Pt. III,

The Doubt and Secrecy Determiner

by

Dr. Lee Outlaw

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If paranoia is the poisonous pretense to the Suspicious Mind, certainly doubt and secrecy play a significant role in both its development and function.

Doubt and secrecy are unique partners in this process, due to their ability to suggest and maintain the proverbial “status quo”. In other words, you might not believe or trust someone but if you simply act in secret, go along or simply keep your lack of belief or trust to yourself, no one will be the wiser.

Unfortunately it is this harboring of doubt and secrecy (holding it in or keeping it inside) which ultimately leads to paranoia and the subsequent suspicious mind. The longer doubt and secrecy linger in the far recesses of the mind, the deeper the paranoia often becomes and the greater the resulting suspicious mind.productmockup

Almost everyone becomes skeptical or doubtful that a person is telling the truth or if a certain thing is real at some point in their life. A few examples might be a fantastic story   which sounds utterly ridiculous and our mind tells us, it couldn’t be true such as, “I caught a fish as big as a whale” or the person we all know that was extremely over weight and then suddenly we see them in a chance meeting and they look perfectly fit; it’s simply difficult to believe so our mind says, “There is just no way”.

Added to this is usually the “secrecy factor”; not that the person, event or thing deliberately hid from you but due to our lack of knowledge about it, our mind says, “Why would they keep this secret”?

The doubt and secrecy determiner will definitely affect the degree of a person’s paranoia. The greater the doubt and the longer that secrecy is involved, the more determined the mind will become convinced that either someone or something is out there, to harm or destroy them.

One of the growing paranoia’s of our day leading to almost near hysteria is that of health care and medical treatment. So much has been reported in the media concerning health and fitness that the minds of people are overwhelmed with skepticism as to what is truth and what is exaggeration; especially with regard to allergies. It seems that almost everyone today has some form of allergy from dust mites to peanuts and even the very air we breathe.

The paranoia over allergies is so wide spread, it is almost impossible to find someone without an allergy and many of these are food related. It would be fine if all the reported allergies people claim to have were diagnosed by competent physicians, but that is not the case.

Such an example is found in a conversation I had some time back with a fellow church member discussing various allergies of his five children. Thinking this a bit strange that all five children would be allergic to all the same things, I enquired as to what the allergies were and how long it had been since their doctor had diagnosed the allergies. He emphasized almost immediately that their doctor had not diagnosed any of the children with allergies; in fact, it was his wife (which he praised for doing so) that had actually made the determining factor that all of the children were allergic to peanuts, citrus acid, dairy of all kinds and most meat. As this father began to describe some of the problems his children were having, it was quite evident that it was the mother and not the children who had the problem, which was obviously a mental health issue for the mom and not a physical issue at all for the children. As this man went on to describe two of his children as slow learners and another as dyslexic, it became apparent that at least three of his children were probably not getting enough protein in their diet subsequently suppressing their learning abilities.

It turns out the mother had rarely seen a genuine doctor and was actually skeptical of all doctors, doubting their abilities, and kept secret that she was treating her children for allergies based on the internet and what she’d heard from other mothers, without adequate knowledge or being qualified; yet openly she told everyone about her children’s (non-existent) allergies. Because of her doubt and secrecy, she developed a near hysterical and probable delusional paranoia giving birth to a full blown suspicious mind. Unfortunately her Suspicious Mind resulted more in her children’s harm than good, keeping them from proper nutrition and the potential of actually deterring their growth and learning abilities.

As that old saying goes, “The mind is a terrible thing to waste” but when the mind becomes packed with skepticism (doubt), secrecy, poisonous paranoia and ultimately giving way to suspicion, it can also become extremely dangerous.

As a good friend of mine so often says (facetiously), “Don’t let reality mess with your thinking”; in other words, people don’t immediately want to believe or accept what they intuitively know is real, because they’ve developed thoughts so strong, their mind just can’t accept what is beyond their ability to believe or reason. When it comes to preventing suspicion from totally occupying your mind and controlling who and what you are, it becomes essential to, “Let reality mess with your thinking” because your suspicion can simply be wrong and a wrong suspicion can harm or even kill you.

In Part four of The Suspicious Mind, we look at ways to both cope with and ultimately eliminate the most dangerous aspect of the Suspicious Mind, “The Conspiratorial Mindset”

© 2016 Dr. Lee Outlaw

 

 

 

 

 

The suspicious mind Part I

by

Dr. Lee Outlaw

The Suspicious Mind

Suspicion

Are you suspicious?

Chances are if you’re like most people, you have your own unique set of suspicions.

It might be about a politician, a friend, an actor or even a family member but in reality suspicions abound.

Strictly speaking, suspicion is defined as a feeling that someone is possibly guilty of a crime or of doing something wrong, a feeling that something bad is likely or true or a feeling of doubt without proof or on slight evidence.

In essence, suspicion is distrust; a distrust that breaks down relationships, families, beliefs and all too often emotional, mental and spiritual stability.

Suspicions are seldom founded, often dis-proven and in many cases become the cause of serious crimes and physical harm or even death.

Suspicion is a close cousin to greed and jealousy of which an argument can be made as to which emotion or action leads to the other. In other words Suspicion often leads to jealousy or greed and similarly greed and jealousy many times results in a suspicious mind.

One of the greatest examples of suspicion and all its fundamental intricacies is the Alfred Hitchcock 1941 romantic psychological thriller Suspicion  directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine.220px-Suspicion_film_poster

In the film, a shy spinster runs off with a playboy (Cary Grant), who turns out to be penniless, a gambler, and an overall dishonest man in the extreme. The character played by Joan Fontaine comes to suspect that he is also a murderer, and that he is attempting to kill her; as such, the perfect example of the “suspicious mind”.

In today’s social media and instant information age, a suspicious mind would seem to be far from the norm but unfortunately it is seemingly more apparent than ever.

Over the next four weeks I will discuss the relationship between suspicion, paranoia, doubt and secrecy and how to cope with every aspect of the conspiratorial mindset.

I will discuss the inter-relationships of each as well their unique differences.

It is important to remember that not all suspicion is bad. Suspicion can be used for good as well as bad.

Suspicion has often stopped crime, war and even prevented illnesses and catastrophes and is a mainstay in almost every sport. What a sports team suspects the other team will do offensively can often win the game.

As Elvis Presley told us in his 1962 hit “Suspicion”:

Every time you kiss me, I’m still not certain that you love me
Every time you hold me, I’m still not certain that you care
Though you keep on saying you really, really, really love me
Do you speak the same words to someone else when I’m not there

Suspicion torments my heart
Suspicion keeps us apart
Suspicion why torture me?

Suspicion is the ultimate temptress that if allowed, will send most people to a nervous breakdown, daily prescription medication and lifelong therapy.

In Part II I will discuss suspicion, paranoia, doubt and secrecy and the general conspiratorial mindset; their differences and their relationships.

© 2015 The Outlaw Observer and Opinion

If they’re not lying they’re probably dying

If they’re not lying they’re probably dying

 

by

Dr. Lee Outlaw

Dr. Lee Outlaw’s latest Christian Counseling article from the Examiner.com

 

We have all lied; in fact, let’s be honest, we all do lie. . . . . . 

How to stay emotionally and mentally fit

Check out my assessment of the Navy Yard shooter and what it might say about your emotional stability from the Examiner.com

#Drtruthman3 #examinercom

Stable

How to stay emotionally and mentally fit

How to determine if divorce is appropriate for a Christian

 

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How to determine if divorce is appropriate for a Christian

by Dr. Lee Outlaw

“Is divorce an alternative for my (possibly) painful marriage which appears to be going nowhere?”

There are so many questions which develop for Christians in determining if divorce is the correct decision.

If you’re one of the many people who struggle with this issue, hopefully this article will help in your decision.

Check out my latest Christian Counseling article from the Examiner.com.

 

How to Control Your Desires

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Learn how to control your desires.

A  four-fold plan to help keep your desires in control